austin_dern (austin_dern) wrote,
austin_dern
austin_dern

Turn out the light, yeah, the light, and I might have a chance

People who know bunny_hugger and I might have preconceptions about how we'd spend our third anniversary. Probably they'd expect we would race to an amusement park and ride roller coasters all day. While correct in spirit this was mistaken in detail. What we did start the day with was driving to Muskegon, Michigan, there to see the lighthouse. Actually, there's a pair of lighthouses, but they share a stamp so far. We'd seen them before, but had failed to get the Lighthouse Society stamp because the visitor's center hosting the stamp was closed. This was despite what the schedule said, although the problem might be we understood their web site differently to how they understood it. Somehow they were able to write an ambiguous schedule.

But that was last year, and this is this. Also the lighthouse stamp is no longer at the Muskegon visitors center but is instead at one of the lighthouses. They'd recently been able to renovate and open it up, and allow people to walk up into one. They have hopes of getting the other renovated and also opened.

The lighthouse steps are this long spiral staircase, ending in a short ladder that bunny_hugger was afraid she wouldn't be able to climb. She was also startled to see a docent in the light shed, the room on top of the lighthouse. After seeing her we realized of course they'd have someone watching the room on top because, you know, unsupervised public spaces that teens could get to? They also had a little porch outside the lighthouse, which we weren't allowed to get onto, even though a half-height door leading out onto it was open. Probably it was just open for the breeze.

The important things, though, were that we were able to get to the shore, and to see the lighthouses again, and to fill in the waiting empty space in bunny_hugger's Lighthouse Society stamp book. And we were mere minutes from an amusement park, too.

Trivia: Nolan Bushness, Ted Dabney, and Larry Bryan agreed to form a partnership for the company that became Atari. Bryan dropped out before putting in his $250. Source: The Ultimate History of Video Games, Steven L Kent.

Currently Reading: Stealing the Elf-King's Roses, Diane Duane.

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