austin_dern (austin_dern) wrote,
austin_dern
austin_dern

To be parted, Dear, from you

Today, we got a refill on our rabbit's eye drops. Not that she's nearly out, but, her prescription expires in May. It ought to be easy to get her prescription refilled, once she has a routine checkup. But when is there going to be such a thing as a routine checkup? So this will buy us a couple of months at least, and then hope that they've figured out some way to handle routine checkups.


Back to happier things, which is to say, Kennywood.

SAM_9374.jpg

One of the Thunderbolt rabbits gets onto the mulch and examines slightly higher flowers.


SAM_9375.jpg

The rabbit takes a moment to sack out surrounded by flowers and maybe watching us in the queue for Thunderbolt.


SAM_9378.jpg

One of the Thunderbolt rabbits takes the quick way down.


SAM_9380.jpg

The Thunderbolt rabbits pondering the situation.


SAM_9382.jpg

And one last, slightly closer, look at the Thunderbolt rabbits. We didn't see them after our ride was done.


SAM_9376.jpg

Ooh, a cryptic but surely meaningful sign in the Thunderbolt station.


SAM_9384.jpg

The inexplicably named Lucky Stand, selling ice cream, with the lift hill for Phantom's Revenge in the background.


SAM_9386.jpg

Approaching the Turtle ride I found this moment, where a leg of Phantom's Revenge (in turquoise) and the back of the Turtle ride sign (gunmetal grey) are nicely not-quite-symmetric. Thunderbolt is in the background.


SAM_9387.jpg

The Turtle ride, looking out in the distance over the river valley; there's steel mills way out there somewhere. And, of course, one steel and one wooden roller coaster.


SAM_9388.jpg

Phantom's Revenge train going by, overhead, from the Turtle.


SAM_9390.jpg

And another look at the lovely network of wires and switches for the Turtle ride sign.


SAM_9392.jpg

The entrance to Lost Kennywood, Kennywood's area themed to the early-20th-century Luna Park, because it's really gorgeous in that way early-20th-century parks were. Note the circa 1904 spelling of 'Pittsburgh'.


Trivia: Two weeks after the Chicago Fire of 1871, Marshall Field had his store (Field & Leiter) reopened in temporary facilities in the old horse barns of the Chicago City Railway Company. Source: The Grand Emporiums: The Illustrated History of America's Great Department Stores, Robert Hendrickson.

Currently Reading: Harvey Comics Treasury Volume 2: Hot Stuff the Little Devil, Editor Leslie Cabarga.

PS: Reading the Comics, March 31, 2020: End March, Already, Edition, wrapping up comics from over a week ago now.

Tags: covid-19, kennywood, rabbit
Subscribe

Posts from This Journal “kennywood” Tag

  • Post a new comment

    Error

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

    When you submit the form an invisible reCAPTCHA check will be performed.
    You must follow the Privacy Policy and Google Terms of use.
  • 0 comments