austin_dern (austin_dern) wrote,
austin_dern
austin_dern

Despite those nets of tuna fleets

If today had a theme it was ``sea creatures you can fondle.'' But that gets ahead of us, and of my guest's question, ``Those signs that read, `Monkey crossing,' do they mean that literally?'' Yes, they do; there are monkeys native to Singapore, and more on Sentosa Island, where they and peacocks form part of the fun of the theme park/island. But first, we noticed a container cargo ship with what must be the simplest bill of lading out there. And we found what is held up as the ``southernmost point of Asia continent,'' a statement not even vaguely true, even if you just look for the southernmost point of an island connected to the Asian mainland by bridge. That's a nice spot, but near as I can tell, the southernmost point on that island is noticeably north of some parts of Sentosa proper. There appeared to be a Red Rover, Red Rover contest. And we found some odd writing in the sand.

The main attraction for today was the Dolphin Lagoon, a lagoon with several trained pink dolphins. Now, my camera has many wonderful features, but it also has a nasty bit of lag, so that despite a lot of trying I got only one decent action photograph during the show. But after the show we got some pictures of the dolphins closer up, and not moving so much. People who wanted could also pay a bit more and get to touch a very patient dolphin who was fed between every touching and at several extra times.

And at the Underwater World, well, there's an exhibit of touchable fish up front. Thus the whole theme of ``sea creatures you can fondle'' since you could feel a shark (rather nylon-y) or a stingray (pretty slimy) or try to feel an archer fish (too fast). The centerpiece of the Underwater World is a long plexiglass tube under the aquarium, so you can see a variety of fish (and a dugong) from below, but of course, this is about when my last round of batteries died. Still, we touched some fish, and other people touched dolphins, and that's enough for a day.

Trivia: A General Electric 635 computer, purchased and installed in 1965-66, was still in use by NASA for driving displays for Delta and Atlas-Centaur launches until May 1983. Source: Computers in Spaceflight: The NASA Experience, James E Tomayko. (He cites, with some trepidation, remembering the last time we tried this book.)

Currently Reading: Pogo Romances Recaptured, Walt Kelly.

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