January 11th, 2005

krazy koati

Ask any mermaid you happen to see

One of the side-effects of the tsunami: prices for various fish are rising sharply, due to the reduced number of fishermen on the Indian Ocean side of the continent. It's not drastic, yet anyway. Still there's now a shortage of fish. Last year was the shortage of chicken and duck caused by bird flu. And then there have been reports of mad cow disease here and there. Anything happens to pork and there'll be nothing to eat except tofu and side dishes.

The campus hawker centers are donating a day's proceeds to tsunami relief.

Trivia: Though the United States claimed Midway Islands in 1867, it did not occupy them until 1903, when the navy chased off Japanese feather-hunters. Source: Why The Allies Won, Richard Overy.

Currently Reading: Far Boundaries, August Derleth. Here's your 1951 science fiction weltanschauung: of the sixteen 20th century stories, six feature the destruction of Earth (five by the planet actually blowing up); six have mind transfer/body takeovers/mind-absorbing plant vampires (including one interplanetary mind swap that leaves the human in a radioactive, heavy-metal-based, quite hot body), and one's set far after a strange species of mammals has passed from the Earth, and archeologists are piecing together the evidence of their suddenly-destroyed civilization (it's by Friz Leiber, so the ending isn't what you think), and an intelligent species of deep-sea serpents, one of whom is intrigued by a sphere filled with the barely-understood `gas' dropped from the top of the world by a thin, broken tentacle... Of the four 18th-19th century stories two feature flight (one by antigravity machine), one a conversation between a modern Englishman and the Venerable Bede, and one is set in the 30th century as Persian archeologists study the remains of the lost Mehrikan civilization.