August 23rd, 2005

krazy koati

She wrote upon it

While I've still got my cold, I suspect this is its crest, and while I don't recommend the experience it's not enough to make me seriously ill. My eyes keep watering up, but the only really visible symptom of my illness is that I'm moving slower than I should. I did go to my class, at least, and gave a pretty good lecture, I think.

I got home to find a note from the Mathematical Association of America; my membership's expired. I didn't notice earlier renewal notices, probably because they send about 14 things a day, all of which seem to be related to the election of MAA officers. They're constantly asking for my vote, and I don't know any of the candidates, positions, responsibilities, or issues. I hope it hasn't been deadlocked for years with mine the deciding ballot, but if I'm the one that's been blocking all their progress should really have said so in one of the first couple dozen letters.

What caught my attention was this letter -- addressed, of course, to me here in Singapore -- had an international postage coupon on it as a stamp, marking it Priority A; ``If undeliverable please return to'' a post office box in Malmo, Sweden.

Shouldn't at least some part of this business pass through, y'know, America? At least touch the continent? Or am I just getting hung up on place-names-in-titles again?

Not related to that is a curious spam subject line I noticed before deleting: McDonalds is under Âtack. It makes the chain sound like it's surrounded by an 80s Hair Band, somehow, which I think we'd all like to see.

In Hearts of Iron action, Italy got 1939 off to a rousing start by invading Albania for some reason, and Germany has found its first ally in Slovakia. I have reason to believe Canada is working on the atom bomb.

Trivia: Any system of shuffling 52 cards will, if perfectly repeated, return the cards to their original order in at most 180,180 shuffles. Source: Mathematical Recreations and Essays, WW Rouse Ball and H S M Coxeter.

Currently Reading: The Assassination of Lincoln: History and Myth, Lloyd Lewis.