December 23rd, 2005

krazy koati

Oh say can you see my two eyes

Today I got my really rather overdue haircut. I was saving my hair up for my regular barber, since I like seeing him and he's proud that nobody but him cuts my hair. It's a point of professional pride among barbers to have clients who come from far away, and with me there coming from 180 degrees longitude away he pretty much rules on that metric. Plus he's a nice guy and I was sorry that when I was last home I missed him (he was sick the only day I could get my hair cut). I figured I'd get the chance to talk about some of the things that went on the past year. While he asked me about what I did, he was more interested in telling the other people in the shop about me, so I got through two other people's haircuts and my own without sharing anything more than what I pay for rent. I came out of the haircut rather slenderer, and maybe ten pounds lighter (I'm very good at growing hair), and found it was nearly sunset when I was done. I'm not used to these short days anymore.

I thought my iBook had its first dead pixel, but it turned out to be a chip of tinsel dust on the screen. The parallax as I walked around should have given it away sooner.

Under belated understanding of jokes: while paging through Bucky Katt's Big Book of Fun I finally got the joke (on page 22) where Rob says, ``Bucky, being cantankerous doesn't help you get your way, you know,'' and Bucky answers, ``I fail to see how that's relevant. Anyhow, I eat some dairy products.'' I'd just assumed it was Bucky being weird since that happens a lot in Darby Conley's Get Fuzzy, but no, it's a sensible pun, which also happens a lot; I just didn't understand it. That's not the longest time it took me to understand the correct joke in a comic strip; I missed the real joke in one Far Side for a decade. Still, it's twice this week I realized the obvious. Monday I realized Isaac Asimov's notes for the short story ``Obituary,'' which say it was inspired by reading the obituary of a ``fellow writer who died young in 1958'', had to be referring to Henry Kuttner. That took only 15 years after I first read the note to understand. Now I just have to figure out who the mouse flying the airplane on the Bucky Katt book is.

Trivia: Movie director King Vidor, losing a US$1200 bet to Sam Goldwyn that his wife would bear a son, attempted to deduct the loss as a business expense. This caught the eye of the IRS. Source: The Speed of Sound, Scott Eyman.

Currently Reading: Small Things Considered, Henry Petroski.