July 2nd, 2007

krazy koati

Remember how we laughed away the hours

Nostalgia hits me from all around. Maybe attacks is the better word. WCBS News Radio 88, out of New York City, has been proudly advertising their special features to celebrate their 40 years as an all-news radio station. (This is actual news, as in, the delivery of short summaries of items of interest. There is little of what is known as ``analysis'', as in, the hollerings of loudmouthed blowhards hoping to make people of different political opinions angry.) They're including retrospectives and rebroadcasts of reports from the past, including ones by Charles Osgood before he was known for bow ties. All this has me thinking about how it seems like it was barely yesterday they were celebrating 25 years as an all-news radio station. I remember it like it was last summer.

Incidentally, my vain searching of Singapore news sites recently has yielded all sorts of wonderful benefits. Singapore's National Stadium, which has been that since 1970, had its closing ceremony this week; it's been replaced with a new sports complex. Back on 23 February 1970, as the stadium was being built and three years before it formally opened, there was a time capsule placed underneath it. Since they're tearing the place down, they went to dig up the time capsule first and found that it's sort of not quite there, anymore. They've been trying to trace out exactly where it was it was buried, and there's a little concern it might have been accidentally dug up when some renovations were done years back.

My mother, while amused that the country where ISO 9000 is the dominant religion has lost the time capsule, is offended by the notion of having a time capsule from so recent. She insists it's philosophically objectionable to dig up a time capsule you have video of planting. She was a bit reassured of the basic sanity of digging up a time capsule that was only planted after she got engaged to my father when I pointed out that Singapore didn't have color television until 1974.

Trivia: Alexander Hamilton's salary as Treasury Secretary was $3,500 per year. Source: Alexander Hamilton: A Biography, Forrest McDonald.

Currently Reading: The Power of News: The History of Reuters 1849 - 1989, Donald Read.