January 22nd, 2008

krazy koati

You're not our crowd

And in case this hasn't got to be a boring refrain: I got another rejection from another college. At least they were nice enough to write, and to send a letter at that. Actually it's slightly passive-aggressive in its phrasing: it just notifies me that the position which was open has been filled, and they leave it to me to interpolate the consequent, `` ... and not by you.'' I'm sure they're going to keep my records on file in case something opens up, since after all why wouldn't they?

This would have been a pretty good one to get, if I could have gotten it: county college, admittedly, which my mother had preemptively warned me was beneath me, but that would mean I could set up right around where I already am, appealing to my desire not to go off doing anything different ever. It would be tenure-track, providing stability. And given the location it does mean that in the three dead months of summer I could probably take as temporary work something or other with my current extruded office product, so that I'd be able to boost the adequate but not really exciting pay of an assistant professor at a community college to something comfortable. But, as indicated, the position has been filled.

An obituary caught my eye: that of 110-year-old Louis de Cazenave. I never knew of him before except, I suppose, by reputation: he was one of two remaining French veterans of World War I. The last one France has is Lazare Ponticelli, also aged 110. It doesn't seem like it could have been all that long ago.

Trivia: In January 1914 United States exports were valued at $204 million. By July 1914 they had fallen to $154 million. By December they were back to $245 million. Source: The First World War, Hew Strachan.

Currently Reading: The Creation of Dino De Laurentiis' King Kong, Bruce Bahrenburg. Everything you'd want to know about the making of the 1976 movie. How could I resist such a book? I realize that may sound like I'm being sarcastic, but I am interested in how movies for which people had, not unreasonably, high hopes got made and turned out to be somewhat less than what was hoped for.