April 22nd, 2010

krazy koati

They gonna know me wherever I go

While the hockey game proper resumed and saw about 4,000 more shots on goal, nobody actually got to a goal, and I was getting ready to send skylerbunny and chefmongoose comical texts about how they forgot to play the fourth period when, what do you know, the Blackhawks ... uh .. did ... something? I couldn't make it out --- it was at the far goal, and it was immediately appealed anyway, so there was nothing to see for several minutes while referees stared at TV screens off to the side.

What happened was a contended but legitimate goal, tying the game with about 37 seconds to go, and despite another twenty shots the Devils weren't able to break the tie. Things went to an overtime period which saw another 500 shots on goal, but no scoring, so they gave up on this playing-hockey thing and went to a shoot-out instead. They explained the shoot-out over the loudspeaker in caerful detail, taking longer to explain all the possible conditions and cases than it would actually take to play. I noticed that the zamboni which came out for the shoot-out didn't bother resurfacing the whole arena, just the goals and a narrow strip between them. I suppose that's all they needed, but it felt like cutting corners.

Anyway, come the shoot-out, the Blackhawks pulled ahead two goals to one, extending my streak of the home team losing when I attend to every game I've ever been at, except for a 1986 game at Philadelphia when we went to see the Mets clinch the penant --- you'll remember that season they lead the National League East by 112 games and clinched in early September of 1983 --- and the Phillies won instead. Should have known.

My brother, who was never long off his Blackberry (and during the precious seconds between shots showed us pictures of his daughter staring awestruck at things from Washington, DC, where they'd gone the previous weekend), found from the report that this was the first NHL game in about nine years to have had no penalties. I thought there was something missing. It happened often that a stick or part of stick appeared without a player, and no player seemed to be missing any equipment, but there weren't any pauses of the game except the goals and an odd thing in the middle of the second period that I didn't understand.

Trivia: The original Telstar received ground signals at 6.39 GHz and retransmitted them at 4.17 GHz, with a power level of about two Watts. Source: How The World Was One: Beyond The Global Village, Arthur C Clarke.

Currently Reading: A Brief History of The Paradox, Roy Sorensen.