October 12th, 2011

krazy koati

Here we are saying goodbye at the station

Here's the second and for now final round of pictures from Rye Playland, until our next visit, whenever that should be.

We went to Playland toward the evening and so got to enjoy it becoming lit to its wonderful early-60s remodelled style.
I was not allowed on the bumper cars. Apparently, I'm too tall. So I amused myself instead taking photos of the Dragon Coaster as the sun disappeared past the horizon.
This is the Dragon Coaster. As part of this wonderful ride, you go rolling into its mouth. A cool mist sprays as you enter so there's fog and surprise and the weird change of sound as you barrel into the tunnels. It's fantastic.
This is a bit of art at the Dragon Coaster entrance.
This is one of the Dragon Coaster's original model cars. They ran until the 1980s, and they don't have any of those fancy post-1920s roller coaster safety devices like seat belts or a restraining bar. You were just kept in your seat by being sensibly dressed for an amusement park in three-piece suit and straw boater.
Underneath the Dragon Coaster is a neat little ``mine ride'', in boats going along a canal path. The rides were built together and part of the mine's experience is hearing the roller coaster rumbling overhead. Unfortunately the lighting and presence of a plexiglass tube make it difficult to prove this, but there's a safety monkey in that tube telling riders how to be safe.

Trivia: In September 1904 there were 1,800 laborers on the Panama Canal Commission's books. The fortnightly payment took six and a half hours to complete, and involved filling in 7,500 individual sheets of paper weighing in total over 102 pounds. Source: The Impossible Dream: The Building of the Panama Canal, Ian Cameron.

Currently Reading: The Far-Out People, Editor Robert Hoskins. Anthology of such wild far-out crazy groovy writers as Isaac Asimov and Chad Oliver. (OK, they're the normal end of things.)