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Wednesday, November 2nd, 2011

Time Event
12:10p
Do you think that this could be the time

For the most part, things at the community college have been quite efficiently handled. I got hired, after all, with just a few e-mails and brief chat. My paperwork was not too onerous despite the need to get something notarized. My selection of courses was done almost casually, and if I didn't actually get a roster until the hour following my first class, that didn't seem excessively late to me either.

There was an awkward exception to this otherwise great performance all around in things. I realized the day before class that I'd never gotten a college e-mail address. The secretary told me I needed to ask the computer services department, which seemed reasonable. They told me I needed someone to fill in a form requesting an account be set up for me, such as, the department head, by which they meant the department secretary. That was a short trip but a satisfying one.

The secretary sent in the paperwork, on behalf of the department chair, and then ... well, a week later I realized I never heard anything coming from it. So I called and asked and the computer services people agreed that I should have had an account set up by now, since it's normally done within the day. They promised to check on it and call me when it went through.

It was the next week when I realized that I still hadn't heard anything. I called again, this time using my Mildly Irritated voice and emphasizing the 'Professor' part of my title, which gets me all giddy regardless of the qualifier before it. They agreed that it was really strange they couldn't find anything about my account. But this time they looked into it and found my account was open and existed, although they didn't know my password, but did know what's usually the default password in these matters. So I was able to log in, finally, to the college e-mail system.

Trivia: By 1913 the Curtiss company sold ten distinct types of overwater airplanes, including a single-passenger monoplane, several two- and three-passenger machines, and pleasure cruisers for four and five passengers. Source: Over Land And Sea: The Dramatic Story Of The Great Aviation Pioneer Glenn H Curtiss, Robert Scharff, Walter S Taylor.

Currently Reading: Forward In Time, Ben Bova.

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