July 8th, 2013

krazy koati

I strike a careless prose and whistle a happy tune

So, a couple months back, we discovered the Travellers Club International Restaurant and Tuba Museum had closed, which turned out to be the fault of a landlord-based dispute that also moved a music shop (owned by the same family as the restaurant) and a New Age bookstore. The music shop just moved across the street, in what bunny_hugger had supposed was the last gasp before the long-standing institution finally collapsed, but guessed maybe wasn't so bad when she learned it was a landlord issue. (The space was apparently to be used to expand a beautician's school.) That's why we thought to visit, partly to see how it was doing, partly to pick up some things bunny_hugger could use now that she's practicing the guitar regularly.

The shop had that indescribable air that a store has when you just know you're the only customers it's going to see all day, possibly all weekend, so we got worried. The selection of instruments seems fine enough, and bunny_hugger even found a new guitar strap and a little booklet of chord positions that seemed useful, as well as a Rolling Stone book of music sheets for various rock classics.

Also while there someone else came in ... we couldn't avoid overhearing that it was someone who'd apparently been given a $50 check, which bounced, and the cashier apologized but he just didn't have the money in the register to make good on it, and pointed out that they've even had to hold off on cashing their paychecks lately, but offered that if she came in the next day the owner should be in and she could work it out with him.

On the bright side the cashier explained (to us) that they'd finally worked out some argument with the town about whether they could put a proper sign for the business out on the street, and they hoped soon people would actually know where they were and that they were still open. Here's hoping.

Beside the book and tablature and strap bunny_hugger also bought a cute music stand, a bit more than was strictly needed, but, who wouldn't?

Trivia: Ian Fleming worked as a foreign correspondent for Reuters in the early 1930s; most notably, he covered a 1933 show trial in which the Soviet government prosecuted as spies a group of British engineers working on various construction projects. Expenses for the trial coverage came to £ 634, but the coverage drew an extra £ 511 in subscription revenue. Source: The Power Of News: The History Of Reuters, Donald Read.

Currently Reading: Asimov's Science Fiction, July 2013, Editor Sheila Williams. Not only are there two alternate histories in this issue, they're two World War II alternate histories (the cover story being the one by that guy with the Moe Berg fixation). This speaks well for the massive World War II alternate history I've got cooking in my subconscious!