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Wednesday, July 31st, 2013

Time Event
12:10p
And your hand is on my hand

We trusted we'd find dinner on the boardwalk or the piers, and preferably something weird and novel. bunny_hugger found just that in one stall with a looping video of TV news personalities going on at length about this concoction. It's apparently an import from Britain: a potato is skewered, spiral-cut to be several feet long, and then fried. Sprinkle on some flavoring and it's suddenly hard to imagine there was ever a time this wasn't fairground food. We got the cheese and onions, as a memory of our time in England last year, and discovered just how stunningly well a spiral-cut potato skewer will stick to the skewer. We expected it to just collapse at a bite, but no, this thing sticks. And it's great.

The search for stuff to eat also got me my first taste of deep-fried Oreos, a concoction I'd missed because it seemed like I'd done enough damage to my body in my life. bunny_hugger insisted they were great, though, and she was as usual quite right: they do turn into something weirdly cakelike in the eating, warm and sugary and crumbly and magnificent. I expect to go looking for them again, although not right away.

I don't know what relation the boardwalk places have with Morey's Piers, but that's all right. It's the sort of collection of silly souvenirs and fried foods and arcades that you might expect, only, several miles long and just gorgeous to visit. bunny_hugger poked around some, looking for an anklet that'd fit her tastes (she eventually did find one, with glass done up to look like sea glass), and other things that'd just be pleasant to have.

I had no idea that Wildwood was such a great place to be. bunny_hugger said that now that she'd seen it she understood why it was where everybody went after their prom: it's a great place to be young. It is, and it was really good being young there.

Trivia: The United Kingdom's defense budget, before the Great War, had been about 50 million pounds annually. During the war it came to five million pounds a day. Source: Source: The Great Game, John Steele Gordon.

Currently Reading: Anywhen, James Blish.

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