November 8th, 2013

krazy koati

Who keeps Atlantis off the maps?

My spouse, the professional philosopher, startled me the other day while we were driving to Meijer's by mentioning that Socrates had been a master stonecutter. That's really the sort of thing you expect to hear on the way to Kroger's. Up to that point I had never imagined that Socrates even had a profession. I'd assumed he had always made his living by committing acts of philosophy against the Athenian population. My mental model was that he probably had started out seeking wisdom and truth and maybe beauty around the holiday seasons. I had thought I was supported in this by Plato's recording of Socrates's discussion with Isocrates, which I had to read for an undergraduate history class about the Cold War, 1945 - 1963, because the professor was bored:

Isocrates: Good fellow Socrates! It has been an agora's age. No, no, say nothing, I'll not be engaging you in any conversations anymore. Everybody knows perfectly well how talking with you ends up.

Socrates: Everyone does? How does everyone come by such perfect knowledge?

Isocrates: AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA [ continues for 26 scrolls of papyrus ] AAAAAAUGH!

Euryptolemus: Sorry to interrupt but the Spartans are invading Mytilene again.


And the rest of this thought is over at my humor blog, which I hope you like. Also there since last week's struggle with having an opinion about a power brick have been:

Trivia: Chimpanzees in the Gombe National Park, Tanzania, spend on average more than six hours per day chewing their food, most of which is ripe fruit. Source: Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human, Richard Wrangham.

Currently Reading: Et Tu Brute?: A Short History of Political Murder, Greg Woolf.

PS: Florian Cajori: A History Of Mathematical Notation, about a great mathematics book I just noticed is on archive.org.