June 1st, 2018

krazy koati

My beacon's been moved under moon and star

Hi, folks following my humor blog on RSS. For the rest of you, here's the posts of the last week:

And what next in my photo tour of summer 2017?

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The promise of a new day of amusement-park-going! Rye Playland's iconic Dragon roller coaster has this adorable childish cartoon near its historic kiddieland section and visible as you approach the place.


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bunny_hugger coming up to the main gate at Playland, ready to go through the gorgeous vintage-1920s entrances.


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Welcoming foliage at the front of the main midway of Playland. Also the National Historic Landmark plaque erected in 1987.


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Playland's Derby Racers, the fastest carousel you'll ever ride. For 2017 the gearing mechanism underneath which makes the horses move forward and backward relative to the same file was running again: look at the relative positions of the four horses here. This made an already thrilling ride even better.


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Derby racer and the gorgeous arched dome protecting it from the elements.


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Anticipation. Derby Racer ride operator doing a safety check before the ride gets going.


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The Whip, one of Playland's historic and antique rides. Note the sign on the left explaining its history and mechanism.


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Cute, slightly put-upon five-fingered mouse in a piece of scenery by the Crazy Mouse roller coaster.


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Main entrance for Playland's Crazy Mouse coaster. The roller coaster used to have a height limit of six feet, which prevented me from riding it one trip. But the limit's since been removed, without any obvious changes to the ride or the decoration or anything.


Trivia: In May 1929 the fifth Congress of the Soviets of the Union proposed altering the work week, so that the nation could make more effective use of factory equipment. Source: Mapping Time: The Calendar and its History, EG Richards.

Currently Reading: Hero-A-Go-Go: Campy Comic Books, Crimefighters, and Culture of the Swinging Sixties, Michael Eury.