February 12th, 2020

krazy koati

Lakeside Park

It's the rare moment a song cue just matches what the post would be about. Here's a couple more pictures of Lakeside Amusement Park, Colorado, not the one that Rush was singing about.

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A look at the Merry-Go-Round by night, this time from the vicinity of the Staride and with the Cyclone roller coaster off-camera to the left.


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The north side of the Merry-Go-Round sign and entrance by night.


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The carousel underneath its neon overhang.


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One column of carousel horses underneath the neon lights.


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bunny_hugger gets a ride on the blue-green rabbit. And in the background you recognize the classic fairy tale of ... ? ... .


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Bunnies snuggling!


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Center scenery panel depicting the Old Woman Who Lives In A Shoe, And Is Drawn By Someone Who Does Pinball Backglass Art of the 70s-90s. Also apparently two is an overwhelming number of children now?


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Looking from the inside of the merry-go-round back outside, so you can see the the sides that are traditionally less ornately decorated and painted.


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More fairy tales illustrated in the scenery panel. I'm not sure but I think the machinery to the right of Mary and the fire extinguisher is the control for the ride.


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Again looking out on the ride, catching the undecorated side of the chariot among other things.


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Looking down at my own horse, getting a view of two of the levels of the carousel at least.


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Looking from just outside the merry-go-round at the cafeteria, the stairway to the Tower of Jewels, and the midway games and park office building.


Trivia: Britain's Second Reform Act (1867) roughly doubled the size of the electorate, bringing number of voters to about eight percent of the nation's population. Source: The Age of Capital, 1848 - 1875, Eric Hobsbawm.

Currently Reading: The Great Salad Oil Swindle, Norman C Miller. Also: when I got this from the library it had a full page of check-out date stamps going back to 1965, so that's either the original check-out page or else the second one it's ever had. Mine was the first check-out since 1988, though, so bunny_hugger had two questions: why was this not culled in the 32 years it went unused (maybe it was put on reserve for a class or something?) and where do I find things like this? I don't know; it's just the weird talent I have that strikes me at used record shows too.