April 9th, 2020

krazy koati

To be parted, Dear, from you

Today, we got a refill on our rabbit's eye drops. Not that she's nearly out, but, her prescription expires in May. It ought to be easy to get her prescription refilled, once she has a routine checkup. But when is there going to be such a thing as a routine checkup? So this will buy us a couple of months at least, and then hope that they've figured out some way to handle routine checkups.


Back to happier things, which is to say, Kennywood.

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One of the Thunderbolt rabbits gets onto the mulch and examines slightly higher flowers.


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The rabbit takes a moment to sack out surrounded by flowers and maybe watching us in the queue for Thunderbolt.


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One of the Thunderbolt rabbits takes the quick way down.


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The Thunderbolt rabbits pondering the situation.


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And one last, slightly closer, look at the Thunderbolt rabbits. We didn't see them after our ride was done.


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Ooh, a cryptic but surely meaningful sign in the Thunderbolt station.


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The inexplicably named Lucky Stand, selling ice cream, with the lift hill for Phantom's Revenge in the background.


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Approaching the Turtle ride I found this moment, where a leg of Phantom's Revenge (in turquoise) and the back of the Turtle ride sign (gunmetal grey) are nicely not-quite-symmetric. Thunderbolt is in the background.


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The Turtle ride, looking out in the distance over the river valley; there's steel mills way out there somewhere. And, of course, one steel and one wooden roller coaster.


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Phantom's Revenge train going by, overhead, from the Turtle.


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And another look at the lovely network of wires and switches for the Turtle ride sign.


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The entrance to Lost Kennywood, Kennywood's area themed to the early-20th-century Luna Park, because it's really gorgeous in that way early-20th-century parks were. Note the circa 1904 spelling of 'Pittsburgh'.


Trivia: Two weeks after the Chicago Fire of 1871, Marshall Field had his store (Field & Leiter) reopened in temporary facilities in the old horse barns of the Chicago City Railway Company. Source: The Grand Emporiums: The Illustrated History of America's Great Department Stores, Robert Hendrickson.

Currently Reading: Harvey Comics Treasury Volume 2: Hot Stuff the Little Devil, Editor Leslie Cabarga.

PS: Reading the Comics, March 31, 2020: End March, Already, Edition, wrapping up comics from over a week ago now.