February 15th, 2021

krazy koati

The last time I saw Paris her trees were dressed for spring

Yeah, still not much going on in my mathematics blog. I've been preoccupied. But here's a couple weeks' worth of writing from it:

With the weekend over I had ... well, a couple days of nothing big. Not much sense taking photos of the office, and only a little sense taking pictures of the extended-stay hotel room I was in for the next several days. So the next thing in my photo roll is from Thursday when I had to check out by 11:00 and didn't have to be at the airport until about 4:00 for what was supposed to be an early evening flight and turned into a 10pm flight.

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And hey, look what I discovered, lost underneath the seat of my rental car! ... I believe that this was a book I'd gotten at the Book Garden, and didn't realize had slid into hiding, but discovering a lost book that's titled Lost Discoveries is just too silly not to memorialize.


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And, for want of a better idea what to do, I went back to the Silverball Museum! They sell three-hour wristbands too and that was just about the time I had. Here's what the city-facing side looks like by day.


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The convention center as seen by day; you can make out the hippocampuses and whatnot above the doors.


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Getting back inside. Woodrail games and, in the distance, the 90s Williams row.


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The 1951 game Hayburners, with a gimmick where various targets advance one of the horses. There's targets that switch which horse advances, too.


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Lower playfield of Hayburners. 1951 is just a couple years after flippers came to pinball at all, which surely explains why they face the wrong way and there's no inlanes and all.


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The playfield of Pinbot, always a nice spacey joy to play. It's a late-solid-state game, just barely.


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The backglass to Jokerz!, a late-solid-state that always interested yet baffled me as an undergraduate. It became one of my pretty reliable games at Fremont over 2019, though.


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The playfield for Jokerz!. It's among the last card-themed pinball games, and a highly symmetric table for the era too.


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Event space in the center of the Silverball Museum, and one staff guy fixing an electromechanical.


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Electromechanical version of Mata Hari; the game also came in a solid-state version. I had tried playing it Sunday, when it had a power failure after two(?) balls. Thursday, though, it was working fine. Just hard.


Trivia: The first American ship to trade at Manila, Philippines, reportedly never paid the customs duties. Source: Smuggler Nation: How Illicit Trade Made America, Peter Andreas. (Andreas doesn't cite exactly what ship and date this was, or what duties were due, but it is in service of a point about how much early American trade was built on illegal transport of people and goods.)

Currently Reading: A Square Meal: A Culinary History of the Great Depression, Jane Ziegelman, Andrew Coe.