austin_dern (austin_dern) wrote,
austin_dern
austin_dern

The sky is clearing and the night has gone out

Now, see, I leave a country for a couple of weeks and what happens? Last weekend Singapore got ``intermittent bursts of green streaks'' a bit after sunset, in areas that Channel NewsAsia's web site said included ``Woodlands, Bedok, Bukit Panjang, Clementi, and Marina.'' That is, northern Singapore, eastern Singapore, western Singapore, and southern Singapore. Some said it was a green light, others saw blue and white, and one businessman (Abdullah Yusof) said it was ``flying very fast going towards Sentosa and it was shaped like a rocket.'' Albert Lim, president of The Astronomical Society of Singapore, said it was probably just a bolide, an exploding fireball. Dr Chew Tuan Chiong, chief executive for the Singapore Science Center, said that as it occurred around sunset it was likely the ``green flash'' phenomenon.

Plainly, it was aliens, and they were obviously trying to find the Expo MRT station. I just don't know how they were missed in far-eastern Singapore. But once again, there's an interesting atmospheric phenomenon barely weeks after I had left the area where I might possibly see it. I've had this happen with auroras and with particularly interesting meteors enough times that it's hard to not take personally.

To belatedly answer my own useless question: yes, there are some instances on record of prehistoric critters being dug up and unfrozen and not turning into rampaging monsters that demolish large parts of the city and then get killed (or chained tightly in the Metropolis Zoo, anyway). I should have thought of this before, but Captain Caveman -- of Teen Angels fame -- clearly meets the specified requirements, and he even goes on to a useful career in super-heroing, saving the world from elaborate conspiracies to defraud twin ski lodges and the like. In a similar vein is Wacky and Packy, a nearly humor-free 70s cartoon about a caveman and his pet wooly mammoth (guess which is which) who get unfrozen in modern times and wander harmlessly around. Their greatest menace is that they cry about wanting to go home on average three times each six-minute cartoon. Still, even with two or three (depending on how you want to count it) positive cases, unfreezing prehistoric monsters and bringing them back to life looks like a losing proposition.

Trivia: Before the standardization of the Prime Meridian and International Date Line, Spain used the longitude of Manila as its date line. Source: Time Lord: Sir Sandford Fleming and the Creation of Standard Time, Clark Blaise.

Currently Reading: The World's Banker, Sebastian Mallaby.

Subscribe
  • Post a new comment

    Error

    default userpic
    When you submit the form an invisible reCAPTCHA check will be performed.
    You must follow the Privacy Policy and Google Terms of use.
  • 8 comments