austin_dern (austin_dern) wrote,
austin_dern
austin_dern

No dogs allowed -- You're not our crowd

I know these days I should expect letters of rejection like this absolutely true example:
We would like to thank you for your application for the position of assistant professor of Mathematics at the College of ---. We regret to inform you that an other candidate has been selected. Your credentials were impressive, and I am confident that you will succeed in your job search. I wish you the best of luck in Math and all other endeavours. On behalf of the search committee, sincerely,

I just would feel more comfortable about it if it weren't addressed ``Dear ${Fullname}''.

There was also the community college which, on top of the CV and American Mathematical Society cover sheet, and the statements of teaching philosophy and research interests that are good for all the big grown-up universities I've encountered, wants me to fill out their own little custom online application including questions like ``Why do you want to teach at the community college level, and why have you chosen apply specifically to --- Community College?'' and ``What skills do you believe are essential for success as a community college instructor?'' Oh, and all the documents already submitted (electronically) will not be considered; I have to re-submit them all (electronically) again. I honestly don't want to sound like a snob coming off a university-position high horse, and I value that education is important and everyone is deserving of as much as they want to try, but come on. This is a nine-month non-tenure-track instructor position at a community college. My motivation to go there would be that it's better than watching Dad sighing at Dr Phil and I'm specifically qualified because I'm a warm body that knows which end of the quadratic formula is loaded.

I had one other job application I'd sent out come back with the note that they're really looking for more pedagogy background than I actually have. That's an easier rejection to take, since I had to admit going in that I wasn't really qualified for that particular job, but it's better making them say it.

Trivia: The word ``workaholic'' was coined by Wayne Oates in 1968, and was popularized in Confessions of a Workaholic which he published in 1971. Source: Webster's Dictionary of Word Origins, Merriam-Webster.

Currently Reading: Asimov's Science Fiction, February 2007, Sheila Williams, Editor.

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