austin_dern (austin_dern) wrote,
austin_dern
austin_dern

A younger girl keeps hanging around one of the loveliest I've ever found

I mentioned that Singapore Day was held in the Wollman Rink in Central Park. The rink is located pretty near the south edge of the park, to the east of the center. You can understand why this would be difficult to find. I had a fairly decent idea where it would be, but deferred to my father in looking at maps and then interpolating from them the direction in which we were to walk, even though, as my mother reminded me, ``He likes taking the long way around.'' I assured her that as long as we didn't end up going past the reservoir we weren't really taking the long way around. Actually, if we just followed the road through the park that we were on, we'd have headed right to it, despite the flocks of joggers occasionally blocking the other side of the street, but my father was more confident we should follow various pedestrian foot paths. He wasn't afraid to ask other people for directions, though, and he did, three times. This established that pretty much any random person in New York City recognizes the features within Central Park and is glad to give directions, but in fact none of them know where the designated spots actually are. It may have sped things up to wait for a Law and Order episode to start up and ask that crew.

Along the way in to the rink -- which had an amusing enough set of signs regarding its public use that I took a photograph of that and will post that when I've had time to process pictures -- there were various booths providing information on sponsoring agencies for Singapore Day. Some, like the Singapore Air booth, were left unattended when I saw them. Others had people gathering up flyers, though, and bringing them to people in the line. The Port of Singapore Authority had one young woman who came up to people and started telling them about the Port Authority. When she came to me she said, ``The Port of Singapore is one of the busiest containerized shipping ports in the world,'' to which I nodded and said, ``Yes?'' She was apparently not ready for someone who might be interested in more information, as she looked at me silently for a few seconds and I wondered if pointing out it was not ``one of'' but ``the'' busiest would just make things more awkward. She handed me the short booklet about the Port, keeping the taller (but skinnier) one to herself, and went back to the kiosk. She returned with more flyers to the next person in line after me.

Trivia: By the mid-1950s the Port of London was the largest employer of manpower in the city. Source: London: A History, A N Wilson.

Currently Reading: Park Maker: A Life Of Frederick Law Olmstead, Elizabeth Stevenson.

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