austin_dern (austin_dern) wrote,
austin_dern
austin_dern

It sure is a hot hot day

I got home from my extruded office product to find a note taped to the lamp: ``if it gets too hot for you close and lock all the windows and turn on the air conditioning.'' You can see how I'd feel at a loss given how the weather when I got home was about 92 degrees Fahrenheit and quite muggy, kind of like the weather every day in Singapore going back to the most recent Great Ice Age. My suspicion is my father wants the air conditioning on, but doesn't want to admit it, and is hoping to hide it in the guise of making the house's temperature less like what I've grown to find comfortable over the course of the decade.

But it is nice to again have the weather that makes me feel homesick, and to have a good reason to take a cooling-down shower after getting in. There just hasn't been reason to take one in six months now and I don't know how it could have been that long. But stepping out of a cooling-down shower is one of life's subtle pleasures, even if it did cause the younger cat, the one who finds dripping water to be about the most interesting thing in the world, to stare without comprehension at the phenomenon of someone showering in the afternoon. Evening, even. (The older cat just stretched out to cover a surprisingly great fraction of the dinner table, which had been cleared off for unrelated reasons and has a nice cheery white tablecloth on it.)

The logic of closing the windows I certainly appreciate, but the point of locking them is kind of past me. In my apartment I'd just make sure they were reasonably slid shut (these were horizontal windows) and not worry about locking, but I was mad with cash flow in those days and I admit a couple times I discovered I'd left a window, most often in the bathroom, cracked open. The electric company appreciated me, anyway.

Still haven't turned the air conditioning on, though. With the ceiling fan going it's very comfortable, and I've got sodas in the fridge.

Trivia: The plan Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux submitted for New York City's Central Park design competition they named ``Greenward''; it was entered as plan number 33. Source: Park Maker: A Life of Frederick Law Olmsted, Elizaeth Stevenson.

Currently Reading: The Age of Napoleon, Will and Ariel Durant.

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