austin_dern (austin_dern) wrote,
austin_dern
austin_dern

Ain't these tears in my eyes telling you

I noticed in the bathroom this morning that my liquid hand soap is blue. That's no remarkable by itself except that my shampoo is also a blue version (billed as ``Vanilla Tea'' scented). If I could find the matching conditioner for that, that would also be blue, although it would be a slightly different blue. On top of that, my body wash is blue as well. I don't know what's gone on my life that all my body-cleansing liquids should be blue simultaneously, but I realized in the shower I was washing my hair with the body wash.

And a couple of days ago I accepted the invitation of iCab to download a new version; they jumped up to a new minor version number, up to 4.2, with all sorts of fixes and improvements that I will never actually notice. I don't want to sound dismissive of new features like where, for the bookmarks (according to the version history), it's ``now possible to activate the synchronization of the bookmarks via WebDAV server'', which I'm sure is something that makes a set of the population extremely happy. I'm just not one of them. And they haven't been able to fix it so when you drag an image off the web page onto the desktop the URL where you got the image from is stored in the file information. (iCab 3 does this wonderful feature, which is so convenient you'd think every browser would.)

But the day after the download it popped open a notice there was another update available, and did I want to download it now? I didn't so much want to, but obviously some bug was discovered and needed patching, and I didn't think about it then because I had something else urgent to get to. When I finally did get the updated 4.2.1 I found what the major bugs fixed were. Some of them related to Kiosk mode, in which the browser takes up the entire window and you can't get out of it and I've only opened this ever by accident. The important fix, though, was to ``a bug which causes iCab 4.2 to report new updates even when no updates were available''. I had never before encountered Russell's paradox in a version history.

Trivia: The number of Bell telephones in service in the United States reached the thirty million mark in 1948; this represented a rise of over forty percent since the end of World War II. Source: Telephone: The First Hundred Years, John Brooks.

Currently Reading: The Wall Around The World, Theodore R Cogswell. Not only is there an address label on the interior page, but the title page is signed, apparently by Cogswell.

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