austin_dern (austin_dern) wrote,
austin_dern
austin_dern

Wow, I'd only seen it on TV, and once in an encyclopedia

I feel that I need to confess something both trivial and ridiculous. I have now knowingly worn spandex. Yes, my body mass index is approximately 14 points above the official maximum allowable for wearing spandex in public without blinding innocent bystanders. In my defense I would like to note that the spandex content is actually only a small percentage --- whether by weight or by volume I don't know --- and that the article in question is a pair of dress socks. While even my WiiFit avatar is not particularly sleek, I can assert that my heels are reasonably trim and my ankles are not plump.

Also I didn't actually know they had any spandex content until I was in the checkout aisle at K-mart. Mostly I wanted some new socks suitable for extruded office product because while I had what would seem to be an adequate number of pairs --- six --- I would often end up short because one of at least two pairs would go missing, hiding inside the sleeve of a pair of pants or stuck to the back of a non-work shirt or swiped by my father, who has a habit of scooping up my socks and towels when they're left in the dryer. So I've been slowly building up my stock of towels markedly different from the rest in the house and I've been getting non-black socks so that I won't be overlapping his color palette. Also this way I can have light socks with wildly different patterns, putting an end to my getting way with wearing socks of different pairs with infinitesimally different shades of black to them. Although that does sound like I'm doing something wrong, doesn't it?

So far nobody's had comments about my new socks. I have to admit, though, the lightly spandexified sock is surprisingly comfortable. If I expand to a tenth pair of dress socks I may have to give the texture further consideration.

Trivia: Charles Cross and Edward Bevan developed in 1901 [*] a method of producing viscose; by 1938, about 300 million tons of viscose silk were being produced annually. The viscose process is still used as a base for making rayon-like materials. Source: Napoleon's Buttons: 17 Molecules That Changed History, Penny Le Couteur, Jay Burreson. [*] Wikipedia disagrees about the date of development. I do not insist either is right; merely, that I am sourced.

Currently Reading: The Last Editor: How I Saved The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Los Angeles Times from Dullness And Complacency, Jim Bellows.

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