austin_dern (austin_dern) wrote,
austin_dern
austin_dern

Everything I want the world to be

Since I'm at a natural pause in the tale of bunny_hugger's most wonderful visit let me catch up on a ``Pay The Rent'' report. The Price Is Right ran a celebrity guest week, with celebrities helping contestants during the pricing games, and getting a spin at the wheel (the amount being multiplied by 100 as a cash donation) for charity. The celebrities included noted beagle Snoop Dogg, noted childhood mortality advocate Jenny McCarthy, noted guy who's in everything because he's Neil Patrick Harris, noted music-based life form Chris Daughtry, and, for Friday, helping with ``Pay the Rent'', noted nexus by which the extraterrestrial supernatural forces guiding human destiny provide clues as to the fate of humanity Heidi Klum.

The prizes this time were a bottle of body wash ($6.49), a bag of Cheetos ($0.35), a twelve-pack of soda ($4.99), a box of Pop-Tarts ($2.99), a box of taco shells ($2.89), and some ice cream ($4.49). Klum proposed putting the Cheetos in the bottom level because they're the cheapest, indicating that the supernatural forces guiding humanity's future are not paying much attention to the pricing games.

Anyway, the contestant put the Pop-Tarts in the base layer (level $2.99); the Cheetos and Taco Shells in the next ($3.24); then the body wash and ice cream ($10.98) and wisely chose to walk off with the $10,000 at that point rather than go on to crushing humiliation with a soda ($4.99) level.

The winning configuration to me looks like ice cream ($4.49); then Cheetos and Soda ($5.34); then Pop-Tarts and taco shells ($5.88); then body wash ($6.49). It so looks like it ought to be possible to swap the soda and ice cream, but, no. And there's no sense trying to swap the taco shells and Pop-Tarts.

So, the differential in prizes this time is $6.14, one of the biggest on record. Seasonal price ranges have been $10.00, $3.70, $3.90, $3.90, and now $6.14.

The differential in level prices is $2.00. For the season, so far, these have been $4.00, $1.50, $1.30, $0.99, and $2.00.

Trivia: By 1933 there were mechanical TV stations in New York City, Los Angeles, Boston, Chicago, Schenectady, Seattle, and also Iowa City, Iowa. Source: Please Stand By: A Prehistory Of Television, Michael Ritchie.

Currently Reading: The Early Fears, Robert Bloch. Any one of these stories is pretty good, but, first, too many of them rely on the ``Twilight Zone twist ending'' which was actually pioneered by old-time radio suspense or horror shows (unsurprising since Bloch wrote many of those) so I can't help seeing the twist coming from the first page, and also, too many of the plots are, ``Did you hear about this legend of a monster? Bah, what a foolish legend of a monster! We men of sense can hardly credit such a legend of a monster! Doodily-doodily-doolidy ... Oh no, the legend of the monster is true! And it's eating us, o the irony!''

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