austin_dern (austin_dern) wrote,
austin_dern
austin_dern

Well, you think it's a chair, but it's growing curly hair

Of course it wasn't just the wave pool we went to. There were several other rides worth getting on, the most roller-coaster-like being the Rendezvous Run, in which we get into an inflated tube and go on a quick but really fun drop, then shoot back up thanks to water jets, and around inside a tunnel to another big drop and shoot up, in time to go actually outside the building (albeit in an enclosed tunnel again) and splash down to a stop. Thursday (and Friday) night the crowds would be so light we could enjoy pretty near instant re-rides and we wondered what a madhouse that'd look like in the summer. We got a taste Saturday morning when lots of people turned up.

There's also the Family Funhouse, which is a pretty good-sized contraption of walkways and rope bridges and all that, with plenty of pipes and water pistols and various things that gather up water and then tip them out to play on, and a couple short slides to do down. We kept noticing there was a yellow slide but that it was closed, for want of attendants surely since how could a slide break down, but every so often someone was there and people were going down, in time for us to miss it. Also there's a giant bucket which fills (not actually) with water and splashes down on the house, which we carefully avoided because we don't need a kerjillion gallons of even warm water dropped on our heads.

We were surprised to find it was past 9 pm when we got to looking for dinner, and more surprised to find the hotel's TGI Friday's lived up to its slogan by knocking off and closing up for the day at 5. (To be fair, actually, 8.) We trusted that there'd be somewhere to eat in the Sandusky area, and even hit the Fast Food District, only to find that everything was closing in the minutes before we pulled up to them. So we gave in, went to the Meijer's, and got some sandwiches and cheese spread and all to eat back in our room.

Trivia: In March 1928 Publix Theaters sent out publicity manuals to their theaters explaining how to advertise Vitaphone: shorts were not just shorts but ``Big Time Vitaphone vaudeville'', to be billed above the features, and they must show the number of acts on the program, with the word Vitaphone to ``dominate everywhere in the ad''. The Speed of Sound, Scott Eyman.

Currently Reading: A History Of Venice, John Julius Norwich.

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