austin_dern (austin_dern) wrote,
austin_dern
austin_dern

When I see depressing creatures with unpresupposing features

If you've followed my advice you've managed to become more likable all around, and good for that. But people don't always know how to stop once they start doing a good thing. This is how approximately 16 percent of all our problems came about: we started out doing something good, such as walking a mile each day, and then kept doing it a little more, such as two miles, or three, and before long we were walking 185 miles each day and finding ourselves far out into the ocean before lunch. Similarly, if you've been too good at making yourself likable it's possible you're spending all your free time and two-thirds of your neighbors' keeping up with the obligations of being liked, such as asking people how they are, appearing in Likability Day parades, or trying out hats. So here's some ways to tamp down that excessive popularity.


And as is my practice now I ask you to follow me over to the WordPress humor blog to see the full article. Also amongst recent entries is a bit about the weather that's been bothring us, or the recent bit where the world got saved after it wasn't my fault it was imperiled, and I point out a really funny Harold Lloyd short, Number, Please? with possibly working embedded video. Thank you.

Trivia: Of the Heeren XVII, the national board of seventeen oversers of the Dutch East India Company, eight were to come from the most populous province of Holland, six from the second-most-populous Zeeland, and one from each of the other provinces of the Netherlands. The seventeenth member was one from alternately all the provinces except Holland. Source: A Splendid Exchange: How Trade Shaped The World, William J Bernstein.

Currently Reading: Conversations with Isaac Asimov, Editor Carl Freedman.

Tags: humor
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